How to be mindful when you are angry

From the New  York Times

“Anger is a natural, life-affirming emotion. It lets us know when a boundary has been crossed, when our needs are not being met, or when someone we care about is in danger. But when misdirected, anger can harm our physical health and our relationships. Being mindful of anger means not suppressing, denying or avoiding it and also not acting out in harmful ways. Instead, connect with the direct experience of the anger, and then decide what action you want to take.” — Jessica Morey, executive director of Inward Bound Mindfulness Education

Read the full article.

Students get their zen on at mindfulness fair

From Pittnews.com

About 400 Pitt students and community members attended the event, which offered talks, family-friendly mindfulness activities including sculpting lotus flower tealight holders, yoga and tai-chi demonstrations as well as free food and various informational tables. The fair also included meditation lessons, a mindful eating workshop and a panel discussion between parents about how to teach children to be mindful.

David Givens, a Ph.D. candidate in Pitt’s department of religious studies and the associate director and co-founder of the Center for Mindfulness and Consciousness Studies, sat behind one of the informational tables distributing information about the CMCS.

Given the increasing proximity of finals week at Pitt, it’s a good time for students to learn to exhale.

According to the American Psychology Association, meditation is the most well-established form of mindfulness. A novice meditator might sit for just five minutes a day, eyes closed and focus their full attention on breathing in and out.

Concentrating on the simple, natural process of inhaling and exhaling diverts attention away from anxious thoughts and depressive rumination. It should come as no surprise that mindfulness and meditation can help those with mental illnesses.
“People find mindfulness personally and practically fulfilling,” Givens said. “A lot of evidence and reports indicate that practicing mindfulness helps reduce stress and helps boost energy levels, focus and concentration.”

Read the full article.

PittEd Magazine March 2017: Mindfulness and Health

This issue of PittEd magazine features conducted by faculty and alumni at the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Education showing that “mindfulness”—the practice of bringing one’s attention to the internal and external experiences occurring in the present—can be a powerful tool for improving health and wellness outcomes for young children, adolescents, and adults.

How generations meditate on mindfulness

From Forbes Magazine online

According to a recent UC-Davis report, mindfulness training triples students’ ability to focus and participate in class activities. In recent years, this sort of validating research has helped push mindfulness from a niche interest to a full-blown lifestyle. From the boardroom to the classroom, Americans of all ages are putting their own spin on the practice. Boomers were originally attracted to mindfulness for its holistic benefits. Today, Generation X is using mindfulness as an individual practice to rise above the competition, while Millennials are using it as a team-strengthening exercise.

Read the article on Forbes.com.

Save the date: 2nd annual Mindfulness Fair March 25, 2017

The Center for Mindfulness and Consciousness Studies at the University of Pittsburgh will sponsor the Second Annual Mindfulness Fair on Saturday, March 25, 2017 at the University Club on the university campus. All are welcome to this family friendly event which will run from 10am to 4pm. The Mindfulness Fair will showcase the resources and activities available to both the campus community and the Pittsburgh region, and will feature wide-ranging talks, yoga and Tai Chi demonstrations, information tables, and family activities. Refreshments will be provided, and there is no charge for this event.

dsc_51391The Center for Mindfulness and Consciousness Studies was formed at the University of Pittsburgh in 2015 to promote scholarship, creativity and well-being through mindfulness research, education, collective practice, and clinical and community service. To this end, speakers at the Mindfulness Fair will include Pitt professors, meditation teachers and community leaders. Topics will range from applications of mindfulness in education and healthy life choices; introducing children to mindfulness; meditation techniques; therapeutic uses; and mindful art and movement. Family activities are planned with crafts, family yoga practices and more.

Mindfulness practices are deeply rooted in ancient traditions, yet are emerging as practices and concepts that are highly relevant to modern life. We invite the entire community to learn more about mindfulness and find out how it can enrich your life. Please save the date and come join us at the Mindfulness Fair on Saturday March 25. For more information email us at mindfulnesspitt@pitt.edu.

News stressing you out?

From patch.com

Reading the news can be a stressful ordeal: Deaths, wars and political turmoil fill the pages of the press, even when we live in relatively peaceful times. But it’s important to stay informed, even if it makes us anxious.

maxresdefaultHow do you find a balance between keeping up-to-date and staying calm? New studies point to benefits of “mindfulness,” an increasingly popular form of anxiety-reduction habits and practices that get people to focus on the present moment, warding off future- and past-directed stressors.

One study, from Georgetown University Medical Center and funded by the National Institutes of Health, took a clinical approach to systematically testing the practice. Led by Dr. Elizabeth Hoge, an associate professor at the university, the research team divided a group of 89 patients with generalized anxiety disorder into two groups: one focused on mindfulness meditation and the other on generic stress management techniques.

Read the full article.

Mindfulness meditation may help treat anxiety disorders

From Forbes.com

960x0Our understanding of the ways in which meditation works in the body and brain is becoming more and more nuanced with every study that comes out. Not only does a meditation practice seem to change the structure of the brain in certain ways, but it also seems to affect the way it functions. One way researchers can track this is by measuring the levels of neurotransmitters, hormones and biomarkers. A new study finds that eight weeks of meditation can significantly alter the stress response in people with generalized anxiety disorder, and this is evident in the levels of stress hormones and inflammatory markers.

The study will be published in the journal Psychiatry Research.

Read the full Forbes.com article.