Monthly Archives: May 2016

How meditation quiets my academic anxiety

From the Huffington Post blog
(by Weston Ross, PhD student at Duke)

Since entering graduate school four years ago, I have always felt that if I wasn’t constantly working on research, it meant that I was a bad graduate student. As an engineering PhD student, I’ve consistently had something that I could or “should” be working on at all times. Constantly having deadlines hanging over my head became very tiresome, and so I would take time away from work, knowing that I needed to rest.

collage studentsIronically, I felt too guilty during my time off to actually relax, preventing me from realizing the benefits of my work break. I would return no more rested than before, feeling like all I had done was wasted time not working. I was disappointed with myself and even less productive than before.

My normal level of anxiety and stress was much higher than it had even been in college, and I stopped being able to sleep well at night. After two and a half years of this cycle, I was tired of being tired, and decided to seek help. I found it by reading self-help books on how to be a happy, whole person, as well as through services at the counseling and psychological services (CAPS) at my university.

In addition to counseling, CAPS offered me a semester long Koru Mindfulness and Meditation seminar. This was my first introduction to meditation, and I have since adopted it as an (almost) daily practice to help manage my stress and chronic anxiety resulting from graduate school.

Read the full article.