Monthly Archives: February 2017

Save the date: 2nd annual Mindfulness Fair March 25, 2017

The Center for Mindfulness and Consciousness Studies at the University of Pittsburgh will sponsor the Second Annual Mindfulness Fair on Saturday, March 25, 2017 at the University Club on the university campus. All are welcome to this family friendly event which will run from 10am to 4pm. The Mindfulness Fair will showcase the resources and activities available to both the campus community and the Pittsburgh region, and will feature wide-ranging talks, yoga and Tai Chi demonstrations, information tables, and family activities. Refreshments will be provided, and there is no charge for this event.

dsc_51391The Center for Mindfulness and Consciousness Studies was formed at the University of Pittsburgh in 2015 to promote scholarship, creativity and well-being through mindfulness research, education, collective practice, and clinical and community service. To this end, speakers at the Mindfulness Fair will include Pitt professors, meditation teachers and community leaders. Topics will range from applications of mindfulness in education and healthy life choices; introducing children to mindfulness; meditation techniques; therapeutic uses; and mindful art and movement. Family activities are planned with crafts, family yoga practices and more.

Mindfulness practices are deeply rooted in ancient traditions, yet are emerging as practices and concepts that are highly relevant to modern life. We invite the entire community to learn more about mindfulness and find out how it can enrich your life. Please save the date and come join us at the Mindfulness Fair on Saturday March 25. For more information email us at mindfulnesspitt@pitt.edu.

News stressing you out?

From patch.com

Reading the news can be a stressful ordeal: Deaths, wars and political turmoil fill the pages of the press, even when we live in relatively peaceful times. But it’s important to stay informed, even if it makes us anxious.

maxresdefaultHow do you find a balance between keeping up-to-date and staying calm? New studies point to benefits of “mindfulness,” an increasingly popular form of anxiety-reduction habits and practices that get people to focus on the present moment, warding off future- and past-directed stressors.

One study, from Georgetown University Medical Center and funded by the National Institutes of Health, took a clinical approach to systematically testing the practice. Led by Dr. Elizabeth Hoge, an associate professor at the university, the research team divided a group of 89 patients with generalized anxiety disorder into two groups: one focused on mindfulness meditation and the other on generic stress management techniques.

Read the full article.

Mindfulness meditation may help treat anxiety disorders

From Forbes.com

960x0Our understanding of the ways in which meditation works in the body and brain is becoming more and more nuanced with every study that comes out. Not only does a meditation practice seem to change the structure of the brain in certain ways, but it also seems to affect the way it functions. One way researchers can track this is by measuring the levels of neurotransmitters, hormones and biomarkers. A new study finds that eight weeks of meditation can significantly alter the stress response in people with generalized anxiety disorder, and this is evident in the levels of stress hormones and inflammatory markers.

The study will be published in the journal Psychiatry Research.

Read the full Forbes.com article.