Category Archives: Mindfulness Information

How generations meditate on mindfulness

From Forbes Magazine online

According to a recent UC-Davis report, mindfulness training triples students’ ability to focus and participate in class activities. In recent years, this sort of validating research has helped push mindfulness from a niche interest to a full-blown lifestyle. From the boardroom to the classroom, Americans of all ages are putting their own spin on the practice. Boomers were originally attracted to mindfulness for its holistic benefits. Today, Generation X is using mindfulness as an individual practice to rise above the competition, while Millennials are using it as a team-strengthening exercise.

Read the article on Forbes.com.

Save the date: 2nd annual Mindfulness Fair March 25, 2017

The Center for Mindfulness and Consciousness Studies at the University of Pittsburgh will sponsor the Second Annual Mindfulness Fair on Saturday, March 25, 2017 at the University Club on the university campus. All are welcome to this family friendly event which will run from 10am to 4pm. The Mindfulness Fair will showcase the resources and activities available to both the campus community and the Pittsburgh region, and will feature wide-ranging talks, yoga and Tai Chi demonstrations, information tables, and family activities. Refreshments will be provided, and there is no charge for this event.

dsc_51391The Center for Mindfulness and Consciousness Studies was formed at the University of Pittsburgh in 2015 to promote scholarship, creativity and well-being through mindfulness research, education, collective practice, and clinical and community service. To this end, speakers at the Mindfulness Fair will include Pitt professors, meditation teachers and community leaders. Topics will range from applications of mindfulness in education and healthy life choices; introducing children to mindfulness; meditation techniques; therapeutic uses; and mindful art and movement. Family activities are planned with crafts, family yoga practices and more.

Mindfulness practices are deeply rooted in ancient traditions, yet are emerging as practices and concepts that are highly relevant to modern life. We invite the entire community to learn more about mindfulness and find out how it can enrich your life. Please save the date and come join us at the Mindfulness Fair on Saturday March 25. For more information email us at mindfulnesspitt@pitt.edu.

Recommended articles just posted on our resources page

Am I Doing This Right? on Mindful.org – Answers to the top 10 questions that everyone asks about meditation by  and .

Are You a Creature of (Bad) Habits? on Mindful.org – “A few simple steps can help you break the cycle of unhealthy actions and develop the skills to cultivate good ones.” Article by .

Take Your Mind for a Walk on Mindful.org – “Meditation can seem so meaningful and significant that it becomes a great big chore. In fact, with a slight shift in attitude, it can be as simple as walking the dog.” Article by .

The Top 5 Myths About Mindfulness Meditation on Mindful.org – Elisha Goldstein debunks some common misconceptions about mindfulness meditation.

How to Practice Walking Meditation on Lion’s Roar. Article by Leslie Booker.

Mindfulness: there’s an app for that

By Gabe Jaffe Mindfulness apps

Mindfulness practice has been scientifically shown to decrease anxiety, improve sleep, heighten productivity, and increase overall sense of well-being. Apps can help us attain these benefits by providing structure and guidance to our practice. We tried out the most popular mindfulness apps and chose our favorites to recommend to you.

For the beginner: Headspace walks you through your entire mindfulness journey step-by-step. Narrator Andy Puddicombe teaches you the basics of mindfulness and then slowly introduces longer and more advanced meditations. After completing a 30-day foundation course, users can choose themed packs in areas such as “anxiety” and “creativity.” To keep you on track, the app displays your progress and sends reminders to sit as designated times. You can try it out for 10 days for free, and afterwards it is $14 per month or $93 for the year.

(Note: “Calm” provides a less polished but similar experience to Headspace for only $10/month or $40/year.)

For the occasional user: Stop, Breathe, and Think is for those who would rather meditate spontaneously than have a regimented practice. When you log in, the app asks how you are feeling and suggests meditations that match your mood. Most of the app’s services are free, and you can purchase bonus guided meditations like “Falling Asleep and “Dealing with Anxiety” for a dollar or two each.

For children: Smiling Mind is a mindfulness app with services specifically geared toward children. Mom and Dad can rejoice, too, because the app is completely free.

For the intermediate or advanced: Insight Timer offers 1000 guided meditations from teachers in the mindfulness and Buddhist communities. It also includes a customizable, virtual bell with options like “ring every 5 minutes during 25-minute meditation.” Furthermore, users can join discussion groups to support their practice on topics like “Poetry and Meditation” or “Women Meditate Worldwide.”

For staying present off the meditation cushion: ChillInstead of guiding formal meditation practice, this app sends the user “Mindfulness Reminders” to come back to the present moment throughout the day. Additionally, Chill provides a unique quote to enjoy and contemplate every day.

Five videos that prove meditation is the new brain medicine

From the Huffington Post

mindfulness-meditation-articleJune 21st 2015 marked the first official International Day of Yoga as declared by United Nations recognising the holistic benefits of the timeless ancient practice.

With technological advancements, scientists in the West have been able to prove the mental and physical benefits of yoga and meditation. This really helps people like us coaching individuals to make use of mind-body remedies for health and fitness, while separating out associated religious, social or cultural nuances.

In honour of the International Day of Yoga, here are few science-based videos supporting the holistic benefits of meditation (meditation = yoga of mind with higher state of personal consciousness).

Continue reading/see the videos on the Huffington Post.